April 13, 2012

USMRR Construction Corps

Seven new figures arrived on the layout today. These guys put the figure count for the layout at 246 painted and installed.


Three Perry Metal figures from their camp vignette. They are very well sculpted, though my wife remarked that they
don't look well proportioned with oversized heads, a trait that many wargaming figures share. Nonetheless, I like how
their expressions seem somewhat forlorn as they watch the regiment of 2-year men heading home.

An Arista flag man converted with an Old Glory Hardee Hat head and new paint. I had to modify the hat to remove
the military insignia. With those striped pants and a mauve vest, he is quite dapper for a flagman!


Other than adding some tree stumps in the background, this scene is complete. The sergeant is whooping it up,
while the private remains impassive at attention.


4 comments:

  1. Looking outstanding, Bernie! I 'dig' the plaid shirt on the guy, well... digging. :o)

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  2. Bernie:
    The regiment marching by the flank looks great. The only thing I'd change in that scene is to move the colors to the center of the column instead of the front for prototypical correctness. None of the published tactics have the colors in the front whether marching by the flank or in column.

    I guess I'm a new breed of rivet counter :-)

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  3. Yes, that is true according to drill manuals if this was the head of the column. But, it's possible that the other companies have already marched past. :)

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  4. If the previous companies already marched past, then the left wing has some serious catching up to do at the next halt!

    There are references to an obscure tactic not found in any of the manuals but used by some brigades in the Army of The Tennessee: Advancing by Column of Eight. General Hazen writes of this when he transferred from the Army of the Cumberland in 1864. There is also mention of it in the regimental history of the 55th Illinois as being used at Chickasaw Bluffs. In this maneuver, from line of battle the wings of the regiment face inward (doubled) towards the colors, the colors advance, and the right wing follows "by file right" and the left wing "by file left" behind the colors. The result is a column eight men abreast following the colors at the head of column. This creates a dense column which can be deployed quickly to the left, right or front by unfolding the wings of the battalion.

    The origin of the maneuver is unknown, but the Colonel of the 55th Illinois had Swedish military training.

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